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Poetry on Prophet Muhammad by Imam Abu al-Abbas Abdullah b. Muhammad al-Naashi


 

I praised the Messenger of God, seeking by praising him a plenitude of the best of rewards for myself;

I praised a man beyond praise, unique in his qualities, far beyond others far or near,

A Prophet whose light shone high in places east, his gifts apparent to the people of places west.

The prophets brought him to us before his coming, news of him spreading on all sides.

The foretelling divines began calling his name, using it to fend off the impact of misleading ideas.

Idols were given voice declaring to God their innocence of those who told the untruths.

They spoke in clear words to the unbelievers, ‘A prophet has come to you from Lu’ayy b. Ghalib.

And evil spirits wanted to eavesdrop hut shooting stars scattered them from their seats.

He led us to where we would never have found our way, so lengthy was our blmdness to clear philosophies.

He brought evidences showing that they were signs from one Almighty in reward and punishment

One of which was the splitting of the moon in two, mountain tops then being covered as if by a turban by the moonbeams.

And another was the rising of water springs between his fingertips while no wells or pools were near.

And another was the rising of water springs between his fingertips while no wells or pools were near.

By it he quenched the thirst of a large crowd; and the water flowed into rivulets in all directions, down to the plain land.

And a well brimmed over at his arrow’s touch, one before too dry for a single drinker’s palate.

And the udder flowed to his palm’s rub, which before when squeezed for liquid had no teat to respond to a milkman’s touch.

And there was eloquent utterance from the hand of a fortune teller about plans of an enemy bent on attack.

And his being told of matters before their being, and of the after-effects to come when these did arise.

And from those signs there was revelation he brought, one that is expedient, to come with a multitude of wonders.

Thought could not conceive of it (Quran), and so the like of which no eloquent man could articulate, nor did it occur to the mind of any preacher.

It encompassed all knowledge, embraced all wisdom, eluding the aim of the scheming and deceitful.

He brought it to us, not through a trickster’s tales, a scribe’s pages, or an author’s description.

Revelation comes to him sometimes to answer a questioner, to respond to a solution seeker, or in the exhortation of someone who is conversing;

For the bringing of proofs, the imposition of laws, the telling of narration, or the interpretation of purpose;

For the quotation of proverbs, the proving of a case, the revealing of some disbeliever, or the suspension of a liar;

In the meeting of some assembly, in the thick of some battle, or as difficult, puzzling problems occur.

So, it came down in different ways, with straight-out meaning and flowing varieties.

Its verses confirm each other, as if their meanings were scrutinized by a watchful eye.

And the inability of man to achieve such as we have described is well known by the many who attempted (to imitate it).

 

[Al-Sira al-Nabawiyyah, vol. 1, pg. 78-79]

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Pre-Islamic poetry by a mother to her son on the sanctity of Ka’bah


 

Subay’a, daughter of al-Ahabb, spoke the following verses for her son Khalid b. ‘Abd Manaf b. Ka’b b. Sa’d b. Taym b. Murra b. Ka’b b. Lu’ayy b. Ghalib, telling him to avoid sinning in Mecca and reminding him what Tubba (Yemeni ruler) had done there:

 

“0 my son, in Mecca, neither do wrong to the young nor to the old.
Preserve its sanctity, my son, and let not conceit confuse you.
Whoever sins in Mecca, my son, meets extreme disaster.
His face, my son, shall be beaten, his cheeks consumed by fire.
I have tested this there, my son, and found those harming it perish.
God made it secure, though no towers are built in its courtyards.
God made its birds inviolate and also the white-footed crows on Mt. Thabir.
Tubba’* raided it but dressed its buildings with new, smooth cloth.

My God humbled his power there, so he made proper sacrifice,
Walking barefoot towards it, in its courtyard,
And offering two thousand camels,
Well-feeding its people the flesh of Mahry camels and cattle,
Giving them strained honey and barley-water to drink.
And God destroyed the army of the elephants, casting rocks amongst them,
Ending their rule in far distant lands, in Persia and Khazir.
So hear when this is told, and understand how things ended.”

 

*Tubban (Yemeni ruler) As’ad Abu Karib was asked to come and plunder Kabah as it contains pearls, chrysolite, sapphires, gold, and silver according to them. King asked two Jewish rabbis about this and they warned him not to go ahead with this plan as he would perish if he tries to destroy it. Instead, they asked him to respect it and do the same as those living there. He was the first to clothe the Ka’bah and made for it a door and a key.

 

[By Ibn Ishaq as mentioned in Al-Sira al-Nabawiyyah, vol. 1, pg. 14-15]

 

“……………To Bura Maan Gaye”- A Poetry on Falsehood of Barelwis

January 14, 2014 7 comments

 

Umar Bhar Karte Rahe Shauk Se Shirk O Bidat,
Hamne Tawheed Ko Bataya To Bura Maan Gaye

 

Kaun Mardood Hai Gustakh e Rasool (Sallallaahu Alayhi Wa Sallam),
Aa’ina Unn Ko Dikhaya To Bura Maan Gaye

 

Kunde Fatiha Shab e Barat aur Milad Nabi,
In Ko Bidat Bataya To Bura Maan Gaye

 

Maangte Rehte Hain Imdad Vo Sada Gairo Se,
Hamne Allah Ko Pukara To Bura Maan Gaye

 

Dete Rehte Hain Ye Gali Hame Har Sham O Shehar,
Haq Ka Paigam Sunaya To Bura Maan Gaye

 

Unchi Qabro Ko Gira Do, Hai Farman’e Nabi (Sallallaahu Alayhi Wa Sallam),
Hamne Unko Jo Sunaya To Bura Maan Gaye

 

Dar-Badar Sar Ko Jhukana Nahi Shaan e Momin,
Hamne Ki Unn Ko Nasihat To Bura Maan Gaye

 

Shirk Hai Ye Taweez Ye Gande Ye Talsim,
Ye Farmaan E Nabi Unn Ko Sunaya to Bura Maan Gaye

 

Tera kya banega bande tu soch aakhirat ki- Urdu poetry

November 24, 2013 4 comments

Tera kya banega bande tu soch aakhirat ki

Is jahan me har taraf hain mushkilen
Har taraf hain aafaten hi aafaten
Kuch ghire aafat me, to kuch bimaar hain
Hai yahan duniya me koi bhi sukhi?
Ji nahi, hargiz nahi, sab hain dukhi,
Chal diye duniya se sab saaho gada
Koi bhi duniya me kab baaki raha.

Tera kya banega bande tu soch aakhirat ki

Bewafa duniya pe mat kar aitbar
Tu achaanak maut ka hoga shikaar
Maut aakar hi rahegi yaad rakh
Jaan jakar hi rahegi yaad rakh

Tera kya banega bande tu soch aakhirat ki

Gar jahan me sau baras tu jee bhi le,
Qabr me tanha qayamat tak rahe
Jab farishta maut ka cha jayega
Fir bacha koi na tujhko paayega

 Tera-kya-banega-bande-tu

Tera kya banega bande tu soch aakhirat ki

Maut aayi pahalwan bhi chal diye
Khoobsurat naujawan bhi chal diye
Dabdaba duniya me hi rah jaayega
Husn tera khaak me mil jaayega
Teri taakat, tera fann, ohdaa tera
Kuch na kaam aayega sarmaaya tera

Tera kya banega bande tu soch aakhirat ki

Jeetne duniya  Sikandar tha chala
Jab gaya duniya se khaali haath tha
Lehlahaate khet honge sab fanaa
Kushnumaa baagaat ko hai kab bakaa
Tu kushi ke phool lega kab talak
Tu yahan zinda rahega kab talak

Tera kya banega bande tu soch aakhirat ki

Qabr roza karti hai ye pukaar
Mujh me hain keede makaude beshumaar
Yaad rakh mai hun andheri kothri
Tujh ko hogi mujh me sun  wahshat badi
Mere andar tu akela aayega
Haan magar aamaal leta aayega

 Tera kya banega bande tu soch aakhirat ki

O Muslim youth, have you ever stopped and pondered- Muhammed Iqbal


 

O Muslim youth, have you ever stopped and pondered
Of which sky was it, that you are now a fallen star?
You were nurtured in the loving care of such a people
Who trampled Crowns of Royalty under their feet.

 

 

They established exalted civilizations, Providing law (Shariah) and Leadership
Those deserted folk from Arabia, who cradled their camels.

 

 

Their pride was in their glorious deeds and their simplicity
Why would such a beautiful face feel the need for moles and art?

 

 

They lived their lives for Allah with such modest
With such pride, that the generous dare not give them alms.

 

 

Upon impulse, what can I say to you, Regarding who were those desert folk
Except , Conquerors, Emperors, Protectors and illumination of the world.

 

 

O Muslim youth, have you ever stopped and pondered
Of which sky was it, that you are now a fallen star?
You were nurtured in the loving care of such a people
Who trampled Crowns of Royalty under their feet.

 

 

If I wish, I could take those visions and put them into words
Perhaps that spectacle would be far better than all of your thoughts.

 

 

You cannot claim any relationship with your Forefathers
You merely speak while they acted, You stay rooted while they went out forth

 

 

Why weep over the loss of governance. It was just a World affair
In the sight of the World, there is no other remedy except from the Muslims

 

 

Alas! Those pearls of knowledge, the books by our forefathers
To see them made use of in Europe, ones heart become filled with grief.

 

 

O Muslim youth, have you ever stopped and pondered
Of which sky was it, that you are now a fallen star?
You were nurtured in the loving care of such a people
Who trampled Crowns of Royalty under their feet.

 

Manners of Learning – Imam As-Shafi’ee


 

Be patient with the bitterness of an aloof teacher
For the embedding of knowledge is when he repels
And whoever never tastes the bitterness of learning
Swallows the humiliation of ignorance as long as he dwells

 

And whoever misses learning whilst young and in bloom
Then make takbir on him four times due to his demise
For that youth, by Allah! If not for knowledge and piety
There is no regard to of what else his character’s comprised

 

[Translation by Ammar AlShukry]

A call to travel- A Poem by Imam As-Shafi’ee


There is no rest in residence for a person of culture
and intellect, so travel and leave where you’re residing!
Travel! You will find a replacement for what you have left.
And strive! The sweetness of life is in striving!

I’ve seen that water stagnates if still
becomes pure if it runs, but not if it doesn’t flow
If the lion doesn’t leave his den he cannot hunt,
and the arrow will not strike without leaving its bow

If the sun stood still in its heavenly course
then people, Arab and non-Arab, it would bore
Gold dust is as the earth where commonly found,
and in its land, oud  is but another wood in store

If one travels, he becomes sought out
If one travels , he is honored like gold.

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